HOW TO IMPROVE YOUR TRAVEL PHOTOGRAPHY

HOW TO IMPROVE YOUR TRAVEL PHOTOGRAPHY

Going on holiday and taking photographs go together as naturally as strawberries and cream, as a horse and carriage, as a Barcardi Breezer by the poolside… But a surprising number of people seem to go into a strange stasis when on holiday, and leave behind their normal rules for taking photographs. Maybe it’s the sun, or perhaps the change of environment, or maybe even too much Sangria, but friends of mine who are usually competent amateur photographers become incompetent “snappers” of blurry, indistinct, and frankly boring photographs when they go abroad.
HOW TO IMPROVE YOUR TRAVEL PHOTOGRAPHY
I’m sorry, but a lot of them do. It is not enough that a location is beautiful, or that your best mate is doing something silly with a local king prawn, or that a strange unshaven man on a mountain trail offers to be your portrait subject. Think. There is not some magic holiday fairy dust that is sprinkled on pictures taken while travelling on holiday that will mean that they will cause gasps of wonder and astonishment when you unveil them to your family and friends on your return.
HOW TO IMPROVE YOUR TRAVEL PHOTOGRAPHY
Here are a small camera-bag quartet of tips to help you take better travel pictures, and reduce the number that you need to delete when you return after having cast a non-holidaying critical eye on them!

1. There’s a difference between shooting indiscriminately all over the place, and taking a lot of pictures of one particular view/event. Unless you want an hour by hour photo-documentary of your travels, and I question why you would, then hold off taking any photographs until you have something that is interesting. Maybe interesting to you AND to the people you will be showing your photos to! Have your “camera brain” switched on at all times, always looking out for potentially good shots. When you think you have one, that’s when you can start clicking with gay abandon. Remember to try different settings and different filters and angles, unless of course it’s a one of quick-fire shot before the moment has gone. When you are back home you can then sort the chafe from the wheat and keep the best ones.

2. Even though you may be considered the principal photographer, encourage your partner, friends or kids to bring their own cameras. While taking photographs may be a personal thing for you, when you travel, especially in a group, you should be prepared to share photo experiences as well as the travelling itself. It’s so easy to share photographs digitally, that the best way to have an interesting record of a trip or holiday is to have everyone contribute to the album, and have everyone agree which ones to keep in. It’s not just for some hippy-dippy sharing philosophy, but for a very good reason. People see things differently and their pictures will reflect the same scene, person or activity in a different way. That means that their angle, settings, and framing will be different from yours, and they may well come up with something that you hadn’t thought of and which really nails the picture!

HOW TO IMPROVE YOUR TRAVEL PHOTOGRAPHY
3. When you come across a scene or event or incident, then think beyond taking a picture of the scene, event or incident itself. Why not turn the camera and take a picture of your friends, or the crowd, or the locals’ reaction to whatever it is. A gasping unrehearsed or posed face on one of your friend while watching a child fire-eater in Goa may be worth more than the picture of the child fire-eater itself. Sometimes a priceless reaction is better than the thing the person is reacting to. And it doesn’t have to be all shock, gasp, waving arms reactions; I have some great photos of local Normandy farmers at a funfair, watching their kids on the rides- dour, dark, heavily contoured faces with a Gitane or Gauloise stub twixt their down-turned dis-interested lips. Some of these even appeared in a magazine!
4. Finally, don’t be caught out while travelling, especially if you are going to somewhere remote and off the beaten track. Take plenty of batteries, normal and rechargeable, and a battery charger with adapter for the voltage of the countries you’re visiting. Plus plenty of spare digital media cards/discs.


Now go on your travels and enjoy!

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HOW TO IMPROVE YOUR TRAVEL PHOTOGRAPHY HOW TO IMPROVE YOUR TRAVEL PHOTOGRAPHY Reviewed by Zahir Style on July 30, 2019 Rating: 5

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